METRA Contractor Safety Orientation


Course Test Link is at the bottom of this document.


Metra Engineering Contractor Orientation Course 2013
Contractor Operating Guidelines

pdf/fullcourse.PDF

pdf/course evaluation.PDF

Once you have read this course and completed  the evaluation you will be forwarded a course completion card (within 14 days) and will be placed on the administration database page (within 48 hours). You must be on the administration database page to be allowed to work on-site at Metra , for/with Metra Engineering work groups, unless, as in the case of emergency or short notice work, special provisions are made to cover safety issues in a thorough on-site job safety briefing.  

If you are connected through a modem, this page may load slowly due to the photographs.

If you have not yet registered, please make sure that you go to the registration page and register. If you take this course and are not properly registered it may slow our response down in placing your name on the completion database.

If you have questions regarding this website contact the webmaster:
webmaster@contractororientation.com
Office: 866-599-2482

If you have any questions 
regarding Metra’s policies please contact:

Hilary Konczal, Director of Safety and Rules: 312-322-6743

Lew Michael, Director of  Rules: 312-322-2812


Main Menu  

Introduction

Roadway Worker Protection

Right to Challenge On-Track Safety Procedures

General Responsibilities

Wearing PPE

Basic Safety Rules

Reporting Incidents


Statement of Safety

Metra is committed to providing working conditions that will promote safety and health.  We believe that all accidents are preventable through individual effort and by creating an environment that promotes a culture of safety.

This safety culture is rooted in compliance with the rules and procedures that govern our operations.   This culture is supported through a spirit of cooperation and teamwork that is focused on personal responsibility and empowerment.

As a commuter railroad, we are mindful of our safety responsibility to the community.  We hold our employees, and all our contractors, accountable for maintaining a safe workplace.  

 

At Metra, safety is a way of life.  

Hilary Konczal, Director of Safety and Rules: 312-322-6743

Lew Michael, Director of  Rules: 312-322-2812

 

Introduction

As a commuter railroad, Metra requires competitive bidding for all engineering projects.  In order to participate in this bidding process, contractors must demonstrate knowledge of the operating and safety rules, and governmental regulations that govern all contractors working on Metra property.

As a common carrier railroad we are governed by Federal regulations administered by both the FRA and OSHA.  Metra operates commuter passenger trains in the six-county Chicago metropolitan area.  The presence of high-speed passenger trains presents a special challenge to contractors wishing to do business with Metra.  In some cases, our trains share track rights with freight and other passenger railroad operators.  The volume of railroad traffic within Metra’s operational jurisdiction calls for strict adherence to our rules, and the rules of other railroads that we share joint authority with.

This web site is designed to provide you and your employees with the information you will need to qualify and, if your employees successfully complete the orientation it will help keep them accident free.  Please select and study the sections of our Safety Rules that are pertinent to the kind of work you will be bidding on with a strong focus on the Roadway Worker section which is extracted from the Code of Federal Regulations.  

Upon successful completion of the course exercise form this information will be transmitted to Metra as to your qualifications.  You will receive the necessary forms and materials required to enter Metra property.  You will receive daily job briefings from the Metra employee-in-charge, which will include the elements contained in Metra’s wallet-sized briefing card.

Your work and safety practices will be monitored by Metra’s Department of Safety and Rules.  Failure to adhere to our rules and policies may result in your project being shut down until you can exhibit compliance.  Flagrant, continuous or willful violations may result in termination of your contract.

If you have any questions regarding Metra’s policies please contact:

Hilary Konczal, Director of Safety and Rules: 312-322-6743

Lew Michael, Director of  Rules: 312-322-2812


Roadway Worker Protection

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Definitions

Adjacent Tracks

Two or more tracks with track centers spaced less than 25 feet apart.

Controlled Track

Main track or siding under the control of a train dispatcher or control operator.

Employee In Charge Note: (Only a Railroad Employee)

The employee responsible for the safety, instruction, performance, and protection of all employees under his jurisdiction.

Exclusive Track Occupancy

A method of establishing working limits on controlled track in which movement authority of trains and other equipment is:

  • Withheld by the train dispatcher or control operator

or

  • Restricted by flagmen

Flagman

An employee assigned to restrict the movement of trains or other on-track equipment. A person may not perform any other duties while flagging.

Fouling

A situation when an individual or equipment is within 4 feet of a track or could be struck by a moving train or on-track equipment.

Inaccessible Track

A method of establishing working limits on non-controlled track by physically preventing entry and movement of trains and equipment.

Non-Controlled Track

Track where movements are permitted without authorization from a train dispatcher or control operator.

On-Track Safety

A condition in which the railroad’s job briefing and rules provide a separation between roadway workers and trains or on-track equipment.


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Key Definition: On-Track Safety

A condition in which the railroad’s job briefing and rules provide a separation between roadway workers and trains or on-track equipment.

 

Key Definition: Roadway Worker

Any employee of the railroad, or of a contractor to the railroad, whose duties include and who is engaged in the inspection, construction, maintenance, or repair of railroad track, bridges, roadway, signal and communication systems, roadway facilities, or electric traction systems, or in the operation of roadway maintenance machinery on or near track, with the potential of fouling a track.

 

Key Definition: Roadway Work Group

Two or more roadway workers organized to work together on a common task.  

 

Contractor Roadway Workers

Contractors employed by the railroad to perform work foul of any track must be trained in the on-track safety awareness procedures. This training may be accomplished at the job site in the form of a job briefing.

Do not allow contractors to foul a track unless:

  • A Metra employee who is trained and qualified to provide protection is present at the work site.

  • All persons have been properly advised of the on-track safety procedures.

  • All persons wear personal protective equipment as required by the railroad.

 

 

 

 

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Responsibilities of Roadway Workers

These rules give the responsibilities of:

  • Employees and contractors

  • Employee in charge

  • Employee responsible for on-track protection

  • Roadway maintenance machine operators

Employees and Contractors     

A.     Responsibilities

Roadway workers (both employees and contractors) have the following responsibilities:

  1. Wear approved workwear.

  2. Participate in a job briefing before beginning work.

  3. Have a current copy of the following rules and instructions available to roadway workers while on duty:

  • On-track safety rules

  • General Code of Operating Rules or

  • Maintenance of Way Rules

  • Timetable

  • Special Instructions

  • Safety Rules and General Procedures

  1. Comply with the appropriate rules and instructions.

  2. Do the following before you occupy or foul a track:

  • Verify that proper protection is being       provided.

  • Acknowledge to the employee-in-charge your understanding of the protection procedures being used.

  • Know who is responsible for the protection.

NOTE: This information will be provided in the job briefing.

  1. Do not perform any work that will interfere with the safe passage of trains, unless protection is provided.

  2. Do not foul tracks, except when necessary to perform your duties.

  3. When crossing tracks, expect the movement of equipment at any time, on any track, in either direction. Follow these precautions:

a.   Look both ways, then take the shortest route. If you are crossing more than one track, stop and look both ways before crossing each track.

b.   Keep at least 15 feet from standing equipment.

c.   Do not cross between standing cars on the same track unless they are separated by at least 50 feet.

d.   Do not cross tracks immediately in front of moving equipment unless you can reach a place of safety on the opposite side at least 15 seconds before the equipment arrives.

  1. Exercise your right to challenge, in good faith, any instruction that would violate an on-track safety protection rule. If you are given such an instruction:

a.   Inform the employee in charge that the protection to be used at the job location does not comply with the rules for protection.

b.   Remain clear of the track until the challenge is resolved.

NOTE: Refer to the challenge resolution procedure.

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Clearing Track for Approaching Trains

Follow these requirements when clearing the track for an approaching train:

1.   When you are notified or become aware of an approaching train, stop all work and clear the track.

a.   Employees or equipment may not clear onto another track unless working limits have been established on that track.

b.      You must be clear of the track at least 15 seconds before the train arrives at your location.

c.      When passenger trains on adjacent tracks are restricted to 35 MPH or less, the employee in charge may allow roadway workers to remain on equipment.

2.   Secure track cars and roadway maintenance machines against movement.

3.   Do not leave tools, material, objects, or equipment where they could be struck by the passing train.

4.   Report to the location designated by the employee in charge during the job briefing.

5.   Stay clear of the track while the train is passing.

6.   Face the direction from which the train is approaching. Be alert for projecting, dragging, or falling objects.

7.   Inspect all passing trains. If you detect a defect or a dangerous condition, notify the train crew using any available means. If the train does not stop, notify the train dispatcher.

8.   Stay clear of the track until you are notified that it is safe to return to work.

Working on or Around Self-Propelled Equipment

Follow these requirements when working on or around self-propelled equipment:

1.   If you will be operating or riding on self-propelled equipment, understand the duties each roadway worker will perform.

2.   Use the proper procedures for getting on, riding on, and getting off equipment.

3.   Do not get on or off moving equipment.

4.   If your duties require you to be around working equipment, keep at least 15 feet from the equipment if possible.

5.   If your duties require you to be within 15 feet of the equipment, communicate with the operator before performing your duties. Make sure you understand the following:

  • Normal equipment operating procedures

  • Location of other workers around the equipment

  • Operator’s blind spots

  • Signal that will warn of moving equipment

Responding to Engine Whistle and Engine Bell

Engines are required to sound the following signals when approaching locations where roadway workers are or will be working:

  • Engine whistle of two longs, one short, one long  (— — o—)

and

  • Engine bell

If an engineer fails to sound the engine whistle and engine bell, report this to the Employee in Charge or a Metra Supervisor.

Employee in Charge

B.    Designating the Employee in Charge

When roadway workers work as a gang, or when two or more gangs work together, one employee must be designated the employee in charge.

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Responsibilities of Employee in Charge

The employee in charge is responsible for the safety, instruction, performance, and protection of all employees under his jurisdiction. These responsibilities include:

  1. Before employees begin work, prepare them for their job assignments with a job briefing:

a.   Discuss the plan of work, job assignments, the specific procedures, and the protection procedures to be used.

b.   Inform employees where to go to clear for trains.

c.   Verify that all employees understand the protection to be used.

d.   Do not consider the job briefing completed until all employees have acknowledged their understanding of the protection procedures provided.

  1. Assign an employee to provide flag protection as necessary.

  2. Conduct additional job briefings with each employee when protection procedures change.

  3. When the protection procedures change or are no longer in effect, have employees clear the track. Conduct an additional job briefing before you allow employees to return to the track.

  4. Make sure that employees comply with all applicable rules.

  5. Promptly advise the proper authority if any employee does not comply with your instructions or does not improve his unsafe work habits.

  6. Promptly advise the proper authority of any accidents or injuries.

 

Employee Responsible for On-Track Protection

Must be a Railroad Employee

  1. Designating the Employee Responsible for 
    On-Track Protection     

If two or more gangs are working within the same working limits, one employee must be designated the employee responsible for on‑track protection for the purpose of establishing on-track safety.

The employee responsible for on-track protection must be familiar with the physical characteristics of the territory.

NOTE: The employee in charge and the employee responsible for on-track protection could be the same person.

Responsibilities of the Employee Responsible for On-Track Protection

The employee responsible for on-track protection has the following responsibilities:

  1. Before employees begin work, prepare them for their job assignments with a job briefing.

a.   Discuss the plan of work, the specific procedures, and the protection procedures to be used.

b.   Make sure that employees understand the working limits.

c.   Inform employees where to go to clear for trains.

d.   Verify that all employees understand the protection to be used.

e.   Do not consider the job briefing completed until all employees have acknowledged their understanding of the protection procedures provided.

  1. When production gangs (tie, rail, surfacing, etc.) are working or major projects are being done, provide protection on all adjacent tracks that are not included in the working limits.

  2. Keep each employee (or the employee in charge) informed whenever protection procedures change during the work period.

a.   Give this information to all employees before the change is effective, except in cases of emergency.

b.   If you cannot notify an employee in advance of changes in protection, have the employee clear the track immediately and stay clear until protection is reestablished.

  1. Notify all employees before the working limits are released for the movement of trains. Do not release the working limits until either:

  • All employees have left the track.

or

  • All employees have been provided on-track protection.

Roadway Maintenance Machine Operators

Roadway maintenance machine operators have the following responsibilities:

  1. You must be trained and proficient on the machine that you will operate.

  2. Maintain at least 15 feet between roadway workers on the track in front of or behind your equipment, if possible.

  3. If workers must be within 15 feet of your equipment to perform their duties, communicate with them and make sure they understand the following:

  • Normal equipment operating procedures

  • Location of other workers around the      equipment

  • Operator’s blind spots

  • Signal that will warn of moving equipment

  1. When traveling or working, maintain the proper distance between equipment.

  2. When possible, keep the Operator’s Manual available on the equipment so you can determine safe operating procedures.

  3. Do not foul an adjacent track with any part of the equipment, unless protection has been provided.

  4. If you are distracted or your duties are interfered with, stop movement immediately.

 

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Conducting a Job Briefing

The employee responsible for on-track protection must conduct a job briefing with all roadway workers before they foul any track. A job briefing is complete only when each roadway worker has acknowledged his understanding of the on-track safety procedures and instructions.

Initial Job Briefing

The job briefing must include all information related to on-track safety. At a minimum, this information includes the following:

  • Name of the employee in charge

  • Name of lookout (if applicable)

  • Type of track authority

  • Track limits

  • Time limits

  • Protection, if any, on adjacent tracks

  • Track(s) that may be fouled

  • Method of notification for the approach of trains

  • Location to clear for trains

  • Required personal protective equipment

  • Procedure to arrange for on-track safety on other tracks, if necessary

 

Follow-Up Job Briefing

The employee in charge must conduct a follow-up job briefing when:

  • The working conditions or procedures change.

  • Other workers enter the working limits.

or

  • Track authority is changed, extended, or about to be released.

 

On-Track Safety Procedures for Authority and Protection      

Key Definition: Fouling

A situation when an individual or equipment is within 4 feet of a track or could be struck by a moving train or on-track equipment.

 

Key Definition: Working Limits

A portion of track within the limits of exclusive track occupancy. Working limits will be established using mile posts, station signs, switches, signals, catenary structures, or orange working limits banner(s).

Authority or protection must be obtained according to the following rules to make sure that on-track safety is provided at all times to employees who occupy or foul a track.

The following sections give procedures for:

  • Occupying or fouling controlled tracks

  • Occupying or fouling non-controlled tracks

  • Using lookouts

  • Using flagmen

  • Working as a lone worker

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Occupying or Fouling Controlled Tracks

Key Definition: Controlled Track

Main track or siding under the control of a train dispatcher or control operator.

Ensure that authority or protection is provided before you occupy or foul a controlled track in the following situations:

  • Equipment is on or fouling the track.

or

  • Work is being performed on or foul of the track.

 

Requesting Authority or Protection

The employee who requests authority or protection must be qualified on the roadway worker rules and either the Maintenance of Way Rules or the General Code of Operating Rules. Follow this procedure to request authority or protection:

  1. Determine if a track bulletin Form B, Form C, or Form D is in effect within the territory that will be fouled.

If any track bulletins are in effect, follow the procedure for Permitting Other Employees or Equipment Into the Same Limits.

  1. Advise the train dispatcher or control operator of the location where the employees and equipment will enter the main track.

  2. Make sure that employees and equipment do not enter the main track at any other point, unless authorized.

The employee in charge makes sure that equipment or employees do not occupy or foul the track until the authority or protection is received.

Permitting Other Employees or Equipment Into the Same Limits    

Follow this procedure to obtain permission to enter into the limits of exclusive track occupancy:

  1. Obtain permission from the employee holding exclusive track occupancy.

  2. Hold a job briefing with the employee in charge of exclusive track occupancy.

  3. Coordinate with the employee in charge of exclusive track occupancy to establish working limits that do not overlap.

  4. Contact the train dispatcher and obtain authority before fouling the track within the established working limits. Authority may be established by one of the following methods:

  • Track and Time in CTC Territory

  • Track and Permit outside CTC Territory or interlockings

  • Foul Time within interlockings

NOTE: Contact with the train dispatcher is not required to establish protection by lookout or individual train detection.

Working Limits

Working limits is an area with defined boundaries located within the limits of exclusive track occupancy. To establish working limits, use one of the following indicators to establish boundaries that are clearly identifiable to a train or on-track equipment:

  • A flagman with instructions and capability to hold all trains and equipment clear of working limits

  • An identifiable place where train movement authority may be held by the train dispatcher or control operator

  • A physical location which trains must not pass without proper authority, including a mile post, station sign, switch, signal, catenary structures, or orange working limits banner(s).

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Occupying or Fouling Non-Controlled Tracks

Key Definition: Non-Controlled Track

Track where movements are permitted without authorization from a train dispatcher or control operator.

 

Key Definition: Effective Locking Devices

A device designed to be applied, secured, and uniquely tagged. The device can be removed only by the class, craft, or group of employees that placed it.

Ensure that protection is provided before you occupy or foul non-controlled tracks in the following situations:

  • Equipment is on or fouling the track.

or

  • Work is being performed on or foul of the track.

Types of Protection on Non-Controlled Tracks

Use one or more of the following methods to establish protection and working limits on non-controlled tracks.

D.    Line Manually Operated Switch(es) Against Movement

  1. Locate each manually operated switch that provides direct access to the affected track and line it against movement onto the track.

  2. Secure each lined switch using one of the following methods:

  • Spike the switch so that the spike cannot be removed unless the proper tool is used.

  • Clamp and secure the switch with an effective locking device.

or

  • Lock the switch stand with an effective locking device.

  1. Identify each switch with a yellow tag.

Lock Derail(s) In the Derailing Position

  1. Position derail(s) to restrict access to either side of the portion of track where work will occur.

  • If track speed is 5 MPH or less, use derails at least 50 feet from the work location. 

  • If track speed is more than 5 MPH, use derails at least 150 feet from the work location.

  1. Lock each derail in the derailing position and secure it using one of the following methods

    • Spike the derail so that the spike cannot be removed unless the proper tool is used. Lock the derail with an effective locking device.

    or

    • Place a red flag by each derail.

  1. Identify each locking device with a yellow tag.

Line Remote Control Switch(es) Against Movement

  1. Request protection for the work from a control operator or other designated employee who operates remote control switches.

  2. The employee in charge of the switch must:

a.   Line remote control switch(es) against movement onto the affected track.

b.   Apply a locking and blocking device to the control machine to prevent movement onto the affected track.

c.   Notify the employee requesting protection that protection is provided.

d.   Leave the locking device(s) in position until the employee who requested the protection states that the locking device(s) can be removed safely.

Station a Flagman

Station a qualified flagman with instructions to keep all trains and equipment from entering the track where working limits are established.

Position Working Limits Banner(s)

Position orange working limits banner(s) to restrict access to either side of the portion of track where work will occur.

  • If track speed is 5 MPH or less, place banner(s) at least 50 feet from the work location.

  • If track speed is more than 5 MPH, place banner(s) at least 150 feet from the work location.

 

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Using Lookouts      

Key Definition: Lookout

An employee who is trained and properly equipped to warn roadway workers of approaching trains or on-track equipment.

Assigning Lookouts

If you are the employee in charge, follow these steps when assigning lookouts:

  1. Lookouts may be used to protect routine inspection or minor work when:

  • The work will not affect the movement of trains.

  • Machinery is readily removable from the track (welding equipment, hand tampers, hydraulic tools, etc.).

  1. Make sure that employees assigned as lookouts are properly trained and qualified.

  2. If employees’ ability to hear a lookout’s warning is impaired, assign additional lookouts.

  3. If visibility is limited by weather or other factors, use other on‑track safety procedures.

NOTE: Employees who depend on a lookout for on-track safety must always remain in a position that allows them to receive warnings communicated by the lookout.

 

E.     Responsibilities of Lookouts

Lookouts have the following responsibilities:

  1. Identify a place of safety where you and the employees you are protecting are to go when a train or equipment approaches.

  2. Communicate the place of safety to the other employees before the track is fouled or occupied.

  3. Devote your full attention to detecting approaching trains and warning employees.

  4. Warn employees of an approaching train or on-track equipment in sufficient time for them to reach the place of safety before the train or equipment reaches the site distance identified in the Statement of On-Track Safety.

      Note: Employees must be able to move to the designated place of safety at least 15 seconds before a train moving at maximum authorized speed passes their location.

  1. 5.   Use a method to warn employees that:

  • Is distinctive, clear, and unquestionable

  • Does not require employees to be looking in any particular direction

  • Can be detected by employees regardless of noise or work distractions

Performing the Duties of a Lookout

Equipment for Lookouts

As a lookout, you must be provided with the appropriate equipment to perform your duties. The equipment must be in good condition and ready for use. Check the contents and condition of your lookout kit before you perform your duties as a lookout.

A lookout kit must include at least the following items:

  • Warning whistle or horn

  • Red flag

  • White paddle

  • Six fuses

  • Orange reflectorized vest or other qualifying protective equipment

Warning Employees of Approaching Trains or Equipment

If you are a lookout, follow these steps to warn employees of approaching trains or equipment:

  1. When a train or on-track equipment approaches from either direction, warn employees in time for them to clear the track at least 15 seconds before the train approaches the point of work.

      NOTE: If the track speed is not reduced by a track bulletin Form C, consider the train to be moving at the maximum authorized timetable speed for that track.

  1. Sound the warning whistle or horn as discussed in the job briefing.

      Note: You may need to give additional warnings around noisy operations.

  1. When it is safe to resume work, give the agreed-upon signal with the warning whistle or horn as discussed in the job briefing.

 

Using Flagmen

When flagmen are used to restrict the movement of trains or on‑track equipment, they must:

  • Be qualified on the Maintenance of Way Rules or General Code of Operating Rules.

  • Be qualified to conduct a job briefing.

  • Not allow employees or equipment to foul a track until protection has been provided.

  • Have the proper equipment required to stop trains or on-track equipment.

  • Know the direction(s) from which trains or on-track equipment will approach.

 


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Right to Challenge On-Track Safety Procedures

Metra and each roadway worker are jointly responsible for ensuring that on-track safety is provided.

Responsibilities of Metra

  • Provide the proper level of training for each roadway worker.

  • Guarantee each employee the right to challenge, in good faith, whether the on-track safety procedures to be applied at the job site comply with Metra’s rules and the right to remain clear of the track until the challenge is resolved.

  • Follow the procedure outlined in this document to achieve prompt and reasonable resolution of challenges.

Form: Right to Challenge RWP (.pdf)

Responsibilities of Roadway Workers

Each roadway worker has the following responsibilities:

  • Follow Metra’s on-track safety procedures.

  • Do not foul a track except when necessary to perform your duties.

  • Before you foul a track, determine that on-track safety is being provided.

  • Refuse any directive to violate an on-track safety rule.

  • Promptly notify your supervisor when the safety provisions to be applied at the job site do not comply with Metra’s rules.

  • Possess or be aware of any track bulletins in effect before you occupy or foul controlled tracks.

  • Follow the procedure outlined in this document to achieve prompt and reasonable resolution of challenges.

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Resolving Challenges to On-Track Safety Procedures

A roadway worker may, at any time, challenge the on-track safety procedures used at the work site. To do so, the worker must:

  • Have an honest concern about whether the procedures are in compliance with Metra’s rules. The worker’s position must be such that a reasonable person under the same circumstances would also have such a concern.

  • Be able to explain the concern about the protection being applied.

NOTE: Employees may not be subject to any retribution or punishment for making a good faith challenge to on-track safety protection.

Good faith challenges to on-track safety procedures will be resolved in the following manner.

Step 1. Immediately inform the employee in charge of all safety concerns. Together, try to clarify any misunderstandings and resolve any differences of opinion that may exist.  If the worker considers the challenge resolved, he returns to work.

Step 2. If, following this discussion, the worker does not consider the challenge resolved, he will:

  1. Notify any other roadway workers of the potential danger.

  2. Remain clear of the track.

  3. Complete the On-Track Protection Good Faith Challenge Form and submit it to the appropriate District Director (or his designee).

The form will include:

  • The names of the worker and the employee in charge

  • The exact work location (mile post, track number, etc.)

  • A description of the on-track protection in use at the work location

  • A list of the Safety and Maintenance of Way Rules that are not being complied with

  • An explanation of the worker’s reason for initiating this challenge

  • The names of other workers whose knowledge of the situation is relevant to the challenge

The employee in charge will promptly notify the Director (or his designee) of the situation.

Step 3. The Director Engineering (or designee) will review the Challenge Form and other available information for completeness and accuracy. He will then determine whether the on-track safety protection at the work location complies with Metra’s Safety and General Procedures and Maintenance of Way or General Code of Operating Rules.

  1. If the procedures comply with the rules, the worker will be notified that no changes will be made.

  2. If the procedures are inadequate, the Director Engineering (or designee) advises the employee in charge to change the procedures so they comply with the rules.

  3. The Director Engineering (or designee) enters his determination on the Challenge Form and forwards it to the Chief Departmental Officer and Director of Safety and Rules.

If the worker considers the challenge resolved, he returns to work.

Step 4. If the worker still does not consider the challenge resolved, he must provide the Chief Departmental Officer and Director of Safety and Rules with a written explanation of why the Director’s determination is being rejected. The Chief Departmental Officer will review the challenge and determine whether:

  1. All documentation is complete and accurate.

  • The Chief Departmental Officer may contact the relevant employees named on the challenge form to make this determination.

  1. The on-track safety protection at the work location complies with Metra’s rules.

  • If the procedures are in compliance with the rules, the roadway worker will be advised why his challenge is not valid and he will be required to foul the track.

  • If the procedures are inadequate, the worker will be advised that his challenge was valid and the employee in charge will be advised to change the procedures so they comply with the rules.

  1. If necessary, the Chief Departmental Officer will contact the General Chairman of the applicable union to resolve protests.  

The decision of the Chief Departmental Officer is final. If the employee still refuses to perform his assigned duty, disciplinary procedures may be initiated.

Form: Right to Challenge RWP (.pdf)

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General Responsibilities

Safety  

Safety is the most important element in performing duties. Obeying the rules is essential to job safety and continued employment.

Alert and Attentive  

Roadway Workers must be careful to prevent injuring themselves or others. They must be alert and attentive when performing their duties and plan their work to avoid injury.

Accidents, Injuries, and Defects  

Report by the first means of communication any accidents; personal injuries; defects in tracks, bridges, or signals; or any unusual condition that may affect the safe and efficient operation of the railroad. Where required, furnish a written report promptly after reporting the incident.  

Personal Injuries and Accidents

Equipment Inspection  

If an accident results in personal injury or death, all tools, machinery, and other equipment involved, including the accident site, must be inspected promptly by the foreman, another person in charge of the work, or other competent inspectors. The inspector must promptly forward to his manager a report of the inspection. The report must include the condition of the equipment and the names of those making the inspection. If requested by the claims department, the equipment inspected must be marked for identification and placed in custody of the responsible manager or employee.

Drugs and Alcohol  

The use or possession of alcoholic beverages while on duty or on company property is prohibited. Employees must not have any measurable alcohol in their breath or in their bodily fluids when reporting for duty, while on duty, or while on company property.  

The use or possession of intoxicants, over-the-counter or prescription drugs, narcotics, controlled substances, or medication that may adversely affect safe performance is prohibited while on duty or on company property, except medication that is permitted by a medical practitioner and used as prescribed. Employees must not have any prohibited substances in their bodily fluids when reporting for duty, while on duty, or while on company property.

Weapons  

While on duty or on railroad property, employees must not have firearms or other deadly weapons, including knives with a blade longer than 3 inches. Employees may possess these weapons only if they are authorized to use them to perform their duties, or if the designated manager gives them special permission.

Alert to Train Movement  

Employees must expect the movement of trains, engines, cars, or other movable equipment at any time, on any track, and in either direction.  

Employees must not stand on the track in front of an approaching engine, car, or other moving equipment.  

Employees must be aware of location of structures or obstructions where clearances are close.  

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Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Who Should Wear PPE

All contractors engaged in activity on Metra property must wear personal protective equipment (PPE) in situations where PPE is required.

When to Wear PPE

  • Wear the proper protective clothing and/or equipment in the following situations:

  • When performing hazardous work or work that is likely to become hazardous

  • When in an area where hazardous work is being done or where hazards could reasonably be expected to be present

  • When working with materials or under conditions when exposure may cause personal injury

  •   When considered necessary by the person in charge of the work being performed

  •   When working with material whose label or Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) requires PPE

 

Eye Protection  

Wear eye and/or face protection when performing work that could injure your eyes.

  • Use the appropriate eye and/or face protection when you could receive eye and/or face injuries.

 or

  • Detachable side protectors that meet the requirements of the ANSI Z81.1-1989 standard
  • When you are required to wear eye protection, keep it ready for use or on your person at all times.

Wear eye and/or face protection when performing the kinds of work described below.

Railway Bridges

  •  Working on, inspecting, testing, or maintaining a railroad bridge (49 CFR Part 214)  

NOTE: If you are near enough to any of the above operations to be exposed to its hazards, you must wear the proper eye protection.

Ear Protection      

 

If you are exposed to high noise levels, you must obtain and wear muff or plug-type hearing protection.

IMPORTANT: Whenever ear covering may impair your hearing, keep a sharp lookout in all directions.

Head Protection  

Wear a protective hard hat in the following situations:

  • In an area where you could be injured by falling objects  

  • In an area with movable overhead equipment  

  • In designated “Hard Hat Areas”  

  • When near exposed electrical conductors that could contact your head  

  • When working on, inspecting, testing, or maintaining a railroad bridge (49 CFR Part 214)  

  • When working on or adjacent to the railroad right of way  

  • At a derailment or other incident that makes the area unpredictable  

  • Whenever your supervisor considers a hard hat necessary for safety  

  • Protective hard hats must comply with the ANSI Z89.1-1986, Class B standard.

NOTE: Hard hats are optional in shop areas outside of perimeter stripes.

Foot Protection

All contractor employees must wear foot protection in areas where falling or rolling objects could injure your feet, or where objects could pierce the soles of your feet.

Foot protection purchased before July 5, 1994 must meet the American National Standards Institute’s (ANSI) “USA Standard for Men’s Safety-Toe Footwear,” Z41.1-1967 standard. Foot protection purchased after July 5, 1994 must meet the ANSI “American National Standard for Personal Protection—Protective Footwear,” Z41-1991 standard.  

The following types and styles of shoes and footwear are not allowed while on duty at Metra:

  • Sandals

  • Cloth or canvas shoes

  • Athletic-style shoes (also called basketball, court, cross-training, running, or tennis shoes) in other than a complete office environment

  • Cowboy-style boots (pointed toes, stacked or sloped heel)

  • Unbuckled overshoes

  • Shoes with thin or loose soles

  • Footwear with untied laces  

Gloves

Wear Kevlar or cut-resistant gloves when stripping, skinning, or cutting heavy wire insulation with a knife or other sharp-edged tool.

High Visibility Vest  

Wear a high visibility vest when:  

  • Working 4 feet or closer to the nearest rail as defined in Chapter 142, Roadway Worker Protection, or in 49 CFR Part 214 Subpart C

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Basic Safety Rules

Safety Responsibilities  

These safety rules are basic guidelines to protect your health and safety. These rules cannot cover every possible work situation. You are the only person who can guarantee that you will perform your work safely.

Safety  

Safety is the most important element in performing duties. Obeying the rules is essential to job safety and continued employment.

Alert and Attentive  

Employees must be careful to prevent injuring themselves or others. They must be alert and attentive when performing their duties and plan their work to avoid injury.

Accidents, Injuries, and Defects  

Report by the first means of communication any accidents; personal injuries; defects in tracks, bridges, or signals; or any unusual condition that may affect the safe and efficient operation of the railroad. Where required, furnish a written report promptly after reporting the incident.

Personal Injuries and Accidents

Equipment Inspection  

If an accident results in personal injury or death, all tools, machinery, and other equipment involved, including the accident site, must be inspected promptly by the foreman, another person in charge of the work, or other competent inspectors. The inspector must promptly forward to his manager a report of the inspection. The report must include the condition of the equipment and the names of those making the inspection. If requested by the claims department, the equipment inspected must be marked for identification and placed in custody of the responsible manager or employee.

Drugs and Alcohol  

The use or possession of alcoholic beverages while on duty or on company property is prohibited. Employees must not have any measurable alcohol in their breath or in their bodily fluids when reporting for duty, while on duty, or while on company property.

The use or possession of intoxicants, over-the-counter or prescription drugs, narcotics, controlled substances, or medication that may adversely affect safe performance is prohibited while on duty or on company property, except medication that is permitted by a medical practitioner and used as prescribed. Employees must not have any prohibited substances in their bodily fluids when reporting for duty, while on duty, or while on company property.

Alert to Train Movement  

Roadway Workersmust expect the movement of trains, engines, cars, or other movable equipment at any time, on any track, and in either direction.  

Employees must not stand on the track in front of an approaching engine, car, or other moving equipment.  

Employees must be aware of location of structures or obstructions where clearances are close.

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Housekeeping

Housekeeping is essential to safety. To provide the safest possible work environment, every employee must actively participate in housekeeping.

Disposing of Trash

Follow these requirements to dispose of trash properly:

Dispose of the following materials daily:

  • Paper

  • Shavings

  • Sawdust

  • Discarded clothing

  • Greasy or saturated rags or absorbent material  

Dispose of flammable material in the proper receptacles, not in drawers, lockers, bins, or cupboards.  

Dispose of pressurized containers properly.  

Do not litter.  

To dispose of material that could be environmentally damaging, hazardous, or infectious, see Disposing of Potentially Harmful Material.

Job Briefings  

Job briefings are essential to on-the-job safety. Job briefings are also required by federal regulations (49 CFR Part 214) before employees can perform certain duties.  

 

On or Near Tracks

Requirements  

Follow these requirements when on or near tracks:  

  • Do not rely on others to warn you of approaching equipment. Be alert and take responsibility for your own safety.
  • Do not cross between standing coupled cars.

Walking, Sitting, or Standing on Track

To walk or stand on track safely:  

  • Do not walk on, sit on, stand in, or foul tracks except when required to perform your duties.
  • Do not walk, sit, or step on rails, frogs, switches, guardrails, interlocking machinery, or movable connections.
  • Do not walk between the rails of a track, except on a bridge that does not have walkways.
  • Expect trains, engines, cars, and other movable equipment to move at any time, on any track, in either direction.
  • Do not stand on the track in front of an approaching engine, car, or other moving equipment.
  • Before crossing tracks or stepping from between equipment, look in both directions for approaching equipment.
  • If at all possible, avoid being trapped between trains on adjacent tracks.
  • Do not sit on rails, ends of ties, bridge railings, or any part of the track structure.
  • Do not lie down or cross under cars for protection or convenience.

Maintaining a Safe Distance

To maintain a safe distance when on or near tracks:  

  • Move to a safe place when moving equipment approaches on the track where you are working or on an adjacent track.
  • Keep a safe distance from passing cars and trains to avoid being struck by falling or protruding objects.
  • When crossing tracks, keep at least 15 feet away from the end of a standing train, locomotive, or cars.

NOTE: When coupling equipment, separate the locomotive or cars by at least 20 feet before you approach either end of the coupling to make adjustments.  

EXCEPTION: This rule does not apply if you are working on the equipment and blue signal protection is in place.  

  • Do not cross tracks immediately in front of or behind moving equipment.
  • Operate a track car or on-track equipment as follows:
  • A safe distance behind a moving train or engine on the same track
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Working Near Passing Trains  

When you are operating on-track equipment and a train is approaching on an adjacent main track:  

  • Stop the equipment.
  • Secure the equipment against movement.
  • Exit the equipment.
  • Make sure all employees are clear of tracks.

IMPORTANT: Do not operate on-track equipment while a train is passing on an adjacent track.  

  • Do not work while a train is passing.

EXCEPTIONS: The following exceptions apply to operators of car top material handlers, tower cars, and self-propelled cranes:

  • You may remain in or on the machine while a train is passing on an adjacent main track.
  • You may move the machine while the train is passing, but only if:
  • You are moving to or between work locations.

and

  • Booms or other wings are secured for traveling.

Fouling Track

Before working on track with traffic that interferes with safe work practices and train movements, make sure employees and equipment have protection. Conduct a complete job briefing.  

NOTE: See Roadway Worker Protection.

Clear Tracks for Passing Equipment  

Do not work on track until the foreman or employee in charge has instructed employees where to go if they must clear the tracks for passing trains, locomotives, or cars.  

NOTE: See Roadway Worker Protection.


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Incidents And Injuries

Incidents That Need to be Reported

Complete and submit reports for the following kinds of incidents:  

  • All injuries involving non-employees (passengers, trespassers, contractor employees, etc.)
  • All incidents involving property loss or damage (theft, vandalism, company vehicle incidents, fires, unintentional releases of hazardous material, etc.)
  • All on-track rail equipment incidents involving any railroad on-track equipment (collisions, derailments, rail–highway grade crossing incidents, fires, explosions, or other events)

 

Reporting Non-employee Injuries

Report injuries involving passengers, contractors, trespassers, and other non-employees.  

  • If the injured person is a passenger on a train or platform, notify the dispatcher immediately.
  • If the injured person is a contractor, trespasser, or other non-employee, notify Metra’s Police Emergency Dispatch Center immediately.
  • If further assistance such as police or an ambulance is needed, advise the dispatcher or the Police Dispatch Center .
  • Have an employee stay with the injured person until the police or emergency medical technicians arrive and take care of the injured person.

Caring for the Injured  

When employees, passengers, or other non-employees are injured, do everything possible to care for them.  

Do not move an injured person except to remove him or her from an area of immediate danger. In this situation, be extremely careful to avoid causing further injuries.

Treating Minor Injuries  

Treat minor cuts, abrasions, and injuries to avoid complications.

Inspecting Equipment in the Event of Injury or Death

Follow this procedure if an incident causes injury or death:  

All tools, machinery, and other equipment involved is promptly inspected by one of the following:  

  • Supervisor
  • Person in charge of work
  • Other competent inspector as defined by the chief of each department

The person performing the inspection makes a written report of the inspection that states:  

  • Conditions found
  • Name of the person making the inspection

The person performing the inspection promptly forwards the report to his or her supervisor.

If possible, the equipment is:  

  • Marked for identification
  • Placed in the custody of a responsible officer or employee
  • Held subject to the order of the Risk Management Department, Division Manager, or Director of Suburban Operations

 

RAIL SECURITY AWARENESS COURSE 

In 1993 a group of religious fundamentalist’s attempts to topple the World Trade Center, by detonating a rented truck filled with ammonium nitrite, urea and nitric acid. 

In 1995 Timothy McVeigh blows up the federal building in Oklahoma City as a result of his growing anger with the federal government. 

In 1999 two members of an anti-government militia are arrested for plotting to detonate 24 million gallons of liquid propane at a storage facility in Elk Grove, California.

One September 11, 2001 a small group of well organized terrorists hijack four commercial aircraft crashing two into the World Trade Center, one into the Pentagon, while the passengers of the fourth cause its crash in a Pennsylvania field preventing its apparent attack on another target.  Thousands of innocent people are killed. 

These are a few examples of terrorist attacks that have drawn attention to the importance of security of hazardous materials in America’s transportation system. 

While none of these incidents involved the transportation of hazardous materials, they illustrate how hazardous materials have the potential to be transformed into terrorist weapons. 

Hazardous materials are essential to the economy of the United States and the well being of its people.  They fuel our cars and trucks and locomotives, heat and cool our homes and offices, and purify the water we drink.  Hazardous materials are used in farming, medical applications, in manufacturing, mining and other industrial processes.  Over 800,000 shipments of Hazardous Materials are made daily. 

Hazardous materials move safely by plane, train, truck, vessel, or pipeline in quantities ranging from ounces to thousands of gallons.  In the wrong hands however, hazardous materials can pose a significant threat.  Addressing this threat is vital to protecting our citizens and our economy. 

The Department of Homeland Security and law enforcement agencies alone cannot guarantee the security of the transportation system.  They need the help of carriers, shippers and producers. 

I have the privilege and honor to be President of the Association of American Railroads.  In this time of heightened security alert, our nation is depending on a safe, secure and reliable transportation system; and, as you know, freight railroads are the backbone of that transportation system.  The secure operation of railroads is critical to our economy, our national defense, and our way of life. 

In the rail industry, safety and security have always been our highest priorities.  Thanks to the efforts of our companies and your personal dedication to safety, we are prepared. 

However, we must continue to focus and heighten our awareness.  We can become even better at what we do.  The Association of American Railroads and your individual companies have developed plans in a continuing effort to enhance the security of the rail system, especially in the area of hazardous materials.

As you watch this presentation, I invite you to join your fellow employees in taking your skills and safety principles to a new level.  This will help us “all do our share: in the years to come. 

We can all be proud to be part of the railroad family.  Thank you for everything you do to provide safe, secure, and efficient transportation.   Mr. Ed Hamburger, President & CEO of AAR

What you need to do while on Railroad Property.

A heightened awareness. 

An alertness to your work environment. 

A commitment to safe and proper procedures and rules. 

The willingness to follow up on out of the ordinary circumstances and situations. 

And the knowledge of how to communicate and make proper notification of exceptional or unusual circumstances. 

Each is a part of what we can do and they are all a part of being a railroader. 

The U.S. Department of Transportation now requires each employee involved in the transportation of hazardous materials to receive training in transportation security awareness.   


Whether you work in the railyards, out along the railroad track, or in a shop or an office, security awareness means contributing to a safe work environment by being aware of your surroundings at all times, complying with rules, instructions and conducting thorough job briefings. 

In other words staying alert for events or circumstances that are out of the ordinary and knowing what to do, while at all times maintaining your safety and the safety of others. 

For example trespassers:  We’ve all seen them on the railroad.  However, in these times it is especially important that we don’t unauthorized persons on our property.  If appropriate politely question the person and inform him or her of the laws regarding trespassing and the potential dangers on railway property for yourself that they leave the property. 

Sometimes there is the more questionable type trespasser, such as the person who just looks out of place.  We know how railroaders dress and usually we are fairly familiar with vendors and delivery people in our areas.  In this case notify the appropriate authorities, supervisors, railway or local police, according to your railroad’s procedures.  Graphic – Police Emergency Response Number. 

In any case, do not take risks.  But, on the other hand do not ignore the unauthorized person on railroad property or on our trains.  Another type person to be aware of is the person who seems curious about the railroad or its operations.  Especially people who ask about times and routes of trains, movements involving hazmat, military supplies and people who wish to know locations of offices such as dispatching centers.   

Also notice people who appear to be lost or confused.  They may actually be lost, or they may be trying to find their way around your office building or work area. 

If you have a new employee working with you, take the time to brief him or her on what is “normal” or accepted in your work area, what they may expect and whom they may expect to see. 

Try to heighten their awareness and give them examples of people or activities that they should be alert for.  Prepare them!  Teach them to recognize the “norm: and maybe they will then recognize the out-of-the ordinary. 

We should also heighten our awareness for unusual circumstances.  Things we might have taken for granted in the past should “get your attention”..  For example, a vehicle parked on the right of way or near your shop, or an unfamiliar truck or van making a delivery.  Now, that’s not to say that every unfamiliar vehicle is “suspicious”.  However, it is important that we pay attention to our environment and circumstances that are our of the ordinary. 

The security of railroad property is also a high priority.  Particular attention should be paid to: bridges; tunnels; fuel storage facilities; yards with high volumes of haz mat shipments; dispatching centers; communication & signal systems and computer centers. 

Rules compliance, equipment and job knowledge and knowledge of your territory or work area play key roles in transportation security. 

For example, while out on the railroad, make doubly sure that locomotives and trains are secured.  When possible lock the locomotive.  Secure remote control belt packs, when equipment is left unattended at outlying points or at remote points within yards or terminals.  Follow the rules.  As always the rules are your best friends when it comes to preventing incidents and injuries. 

Double check switches.  Determine if they are lined and locked properly.  Pay close attention to derails.  Lock all company vehicles when not in use.  Check buildings and shanties for security, lock-‘em up! 

Pay special attention to areas or buildings that may be used to store hazardous materials.  If an area, building, or office is restricted or secured, that’s just what it should be, restricted to entry.  Do not allow unauthorized persons to enter and if unauthorized persons do seek entry, refer them to the proper authority. 

If you work with a computer take all security precautions.  Lock it down when it is unattended.  Never share your user ID and password, and don’t allow others to use your computer while logged on.  There is a lot of information that can be gained through our company computer network, such as train documents and car movement records. 

Protect your company equipment.  Lock up all materials. 

Car inspections are a vital part of our rail security.  Increase your scrutiny of railcars especially hazardous materials and military shipments.  Look for unusual items mounted on or under cars.  Report unusual conditions to the appropriate authority.  Look for signs of tampering. 

Each of us is familiar with the routines and people we see every day in our office, yard or shop.  If you see an unfamiliar face or questionable situation, ask questions if it seems safe to do so.  Check credentials from those who say they work for a government agency.  Peacefully confront strangers or visitors on property.  Determine if they have a business need to be there, such as a contractor.  If there is any question in these cases notify your supervisor or appropriate authority. 

Watch and listen.  Be aware of personal conversations with others on or off the property about your job and yard.  Unusual interest in technical details should heighten your suspicion and should be reported.  Do not speak openly, about detailed information on trains, direction of movement, schedules and consists, especially hazardous materials, business car and military movements.  This includes posting information to internet sites. 

As always, in any effort teamwork and communication is imperative.  Be familiar with and follow instructions on the emergency response procedures. 

Keep one another focused; discuss alertness and security at job briefings and safety meeting; remind one another of things to look out for; share information; discuss precautions and proper responses to situations; follow the plan; and make a contribution.  Each of us has a responsibility.  It’s bigger than just our work group or railroad.

Now, we know we have covered a lot of ground in a short time and of course we can’t include every situation or response in a program of this length.  That’s where you come in.  Remember, if you do notice people or events out-of-the ordinary, don’t over-react.  Don’t under-react either.  Take appropriate action, and that means being prepared.  Know the appropriate action or notification.  Take the time to prepare yourself with knowledge.  And most of all DO NOT  take risks, with your safety or the safety of others.

As we said earlier all citizens, all railroaders have a responsibility to the safety and security of our families, homes, communities and our nation.  There are not better reasons to heighten our alertness and awareness.  It is up to all of us “to do our share”.  We are the eyes and ears of safety and security for the railroad.  We are each on the front line of defense.  We are all in it together.

Rail security awareness, do what you’ve always done, only better. 

Make sure while on Railroad property that you know the Railroad emergency number.

 


WHEREAS,  you and/or your company are  obtaining this orientation and any of the materials provided for certain of its employees who work on or about railroad equipment, and WHEREAS, THE METRA RAILROAD COMPANY, hereinafter called "METRA", is willing to provide this orientation and any of the materials provided, but only upon the following terms and conditions, NOW THEREFORE, it is agreed as follows: In consideration of this orientation and any of the materials provided to the employee and management of your company or you as an individual for their internal use by you, hereby assume all risk of and agrees to indemnify and hold METRA and the administrator of this site harmless from any personal injury to or death of its officers, agents and employees, and loss of or damage to property in its or their custody or possession, which shall in any manner arise from or be alleged to be due to in, in whole or in part, this orientation or materials provided to its employees by METRA,  EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT SUCH INJURIES OR DAMAGES BE CAUSED BY OR CONTRIBUTED TO BY THE INTENTIONAL MISCONDUCT OR GROSS NEGLIGENCE OF  METRA, ITS OFFICERS, EMPLOYEES, AGENTS, OR ANY THIRD PARTY.  METRA is hereby released and forever discharged, as well as its subsidiary and affiliated companies, and the officers, agents, and employees of said companies, from all claims, liabilities, and costs of every kind by reason of any such injury to or death of persons and loss of or damage to property. This Release shall be binding upon the submission of this document.

I understand that by submitting my name and, as applicable, the names of the other individuals who have completed this orientation section, I am indicating that (I), these personnel have actually completed this section of the orientation and understand this document. I am an employee and/or officer of the corporation named above, who is duly authorized and fully empowered by said corporation to execute the same on its behalf or myself as an individual.  

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